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We have fireworks, but we don't want fires

By: Sarah Nowshiravan, Special to the Telegraph
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With the highest chance of a fire in and around the city in a decade this year, there are a variety of safety guidelines you should follow in order to have a safe and enjoyable night. The first guideline is to always store fireworks in a location that is dry and cool if purchased before the night of the Fourth. When the Fourth does come along, remember to abide by the instructions on each individual firework and make sure the fireworks used are state approved “safe and sane.” In order for a firework to pass as “safe and sane” it must not fly, rotate or explode. The second safety guideline is to decrease any chance of fire, by lighting the fireworks on a hard and flat surface to maintain stability so it does not fall over. Fireworks should also never be lit nears homes, dry grass or trees. And when lighting off fireworks remember to have a bucket of water or a garden hose nearby in case a fire ignites. Another cause of Fourth fires is illegal or modified fireworks that land on homes or trees. City officials ask that you report illegal or modified fireworks immediately by calling the police department. “If caught with illegal or modified fireworks such as bottle rockets or mortars, there will be consequences for those individuals,” said John Haberek, Folsom Fire Marshal. “The minimum fine is $1,000 if caught and could include state or county jail if considered a felony.” Beside fire injuries, children and adults must be careful and aware of oncoming traffic especially since many lights are turned off for the firework display and drivers may not see kids running in and out of the streets. That is why it is important to always have a responsible adult around, if any injury or fire were to occur. “With the condition now with fires in Shasta and more than 400 houses damaged and the danger of fireworks through this next week, rules of where and how they should be lit are very important, “ said Jim O’Camb, Division Chief Marshal of El Dorado county fire. Have defensive space and remember to be aware of your surroundings.”