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Two rescue horses birth colts at Grace Foundation in El Dorado Hills

Money, volunteers sought for facility
By: Penne Usher, Telegraph Correspondent
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Two new colts born to mares seized from a Susanville ranch show that good can come out of a bad situation. The Grace Foundation in El Dorado Hills has taken in, nursed and cared for more than 50 neglected and abused equine that were removed from a Susanville ranch last year. Grace founder and executive director Beth DeCaprio said rescued mare Bonny, gave birth to a healthy colt on March 23. About a week later, another mare they named Bridgette gave birth to a “beautiful baby boy.” The two mares, along with dozens of other abused, malnourished and neglected horses, were either seized or relinquished from Whispering Pines Ranch in Susanville. Linda Davis, of Orangevale, heard about Grace from a mutual friend. In the past she has donated a recreational vehicle for the ranch’s use as well as made donations. Davis is now sponsoring one of the newborn colts, which she gets to name. She is sponsoring Bridgette’s colt — a paint — and, as of Friday, was considering the name Geronimo. “I am trying to come up with a name that signifies his strength as well as his heritage,” Davis said as she watched the youngster buck and frolic in his paddock alongside his watchful mother. On Saturday, the colt was given the name Cheveyo. Donations help pay for board and feeding of the animals. The horses’ original owner, Dwight Bennett of Whispering Pines ranch, where the mares were taken from, has been charged with 70 counts of animal cruelty and is currently out of custody and awaiting trial. He denies all allegations. Bennett was arrested Oct. 25 and was initially charged with 30 count of animal cruelty. In May, 20 horses were rescued from the Susanville property and 36 more were taken into protective custody in August. Since then, Grace has been responsible for their health and well-being. Not all of the animals could be saved. The remains of 28 horses and three dogs were found at the property in “various states of decomposition and may range from recent to many years old,” according to a prior press release from the Lassen County District Attorney’s office. The horses were stunted from a lack of nutrients after not being fed or watered for some time, according to authorities. Bennett reportedly lost his home and was no longer financially capable of caring for the horses that were left to die. He has since filed for bankruptcy. The Grace Foundation, whose mission it is to rescue and rehabilitate abused and neglected horses as well as other animals, has taken in more than 210 animals since January.Money, volunteers sought for facility By Penne Usher Telegraph Correspondent Two new colts born to mares seized from a Susanville ranch show that good can come out of a bad situation. The Grace Foundation in El Dorado Hills has taken in, nursed and cared for more than 50 neglected and abused equine that were removed from a Susanville ranch last year. Grace founder and executive director Beth DeCaprio said rescued mare Bonny, gave birth to a healthy colt on March 23. About a week later, another mare they named Bridgette gave birth to a “beautiful baby boy.” The two mares, along with dozens of other abused, malnourished and neglected horses, were either seized or relinquished from Whispering Pines Ranch in Susanville. Linda Davis, of Orangevale, heard about Grace from a mutual friend. In the past she has donated a recreational vehicle for the ranch’s use as well as made donations. Davis is now sponsoring one of the newborn colts, which she gets to name. She is sponsoring Bridgette’s colt — a paint — and, as of Friday, was considering the name Geronimo. “I am trying to come up with a name that signifies his strength as well as his heritage,” Davis said as she watched the youngster buck and frolic in his paddock alongside his watchful mother. On Saturday, the colt was given the name Cheveyo. Donations help pay for board and feeding of the animals. The horses’ original owner, Dwight Bennett of Whispering Pines ranch, where the mares were taken from, has been charged with 70 counts of animal cruelty and is currently out of custody and awaiting trial. He denies all allegations. Bennett was arrested Oct. 25 and was initially charged with 30 count of animal cruelty. In May, 20 horses were rescued from the Susanville property and 36 more were taken into protective custody in August. Since then, Grace has been responsible for their health and well-being. Not all of the animals could be saved. The remains of 28 horses and three dogs were found at the property in “various states of decomposition and may range from recent to many years old,” according to a prior press release from the Lassen County District Attorney’s office. The horses were stunted from a lack of nutrients after not being fed or watered for some time, according to authorities. Bennett reportedly lost his home and was no longer financially capable of caring for the horses that were left to die. He has since filed for bankruptcy. The Grace Foundation, whose mission it is to rescue and rehabilitate abused and neglected horses as well as other animals, has taken in more than 210 animals since January. * * * HOW TO HELP Visit thegracefoundation.com for details on making donations or volunteering time at the El Dorado Hills facility.